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london

updated fri 14 mar 08

 

J.C. Pot on sun 14 dec 97

Hello there in cyberspace,

I go to LOndon tommorrow.
Are there people who know what is interesting to see for a potter there??

Hannie

Israel Amirav on thu 28 may 98

Don and Roz,
There is a wonderful gallery on Marshalls St ( # 7) ,that has the best of
contemporary pottery.Very easy to find ,j ust a short walk from Oxford
Circus.

Have a good trip!

Naama in Israel

Beth Yeatman Spindler on fri 29 may 98

Hi, Don and Roz.......
Check out the Hart Gallery
113 Upper Street
Islington, London
Telephone: (0171) 704-1131, Fax: (0171) 704 1707

Also...not sure of the location of his studio...in fact the address below
might be for the studio................Edmund de Waal...(just published book
on Bernard Leach).
He shares studio with another potter Julian Stair...both were in USA back in
April for several workshops...was fortunate to attend one of the
them......anyway,
address on card he gave to attendees is: 9 Maude road
London SES 8NY
Telephone: 0171-703-5867
Fax
0171-701-5079

Both work in porcelain.......beautiful teapots!!

Hope this is of some help...

Beth in the Blue Ridge Mtns Foothills of VA......

P. S. and my thanks to all clayarters who responded to my request for
potters, galleries in Scotland, especially onthe Isle of Skye...really
appreciate your response!!

barbara lund on sat 30 may 98

I wasn't going to respond to the request for London pot info but since no
one has mentioned it, what ever you do, go to the top floor of the Victoria
and albert Museum, just down the road from Harrods and right next to the
Natural History Museum. there are a number of Lucie Rie and Hans Coper pots
there plus thousands of magnificant pots from all over the world and
centuries past. also there are many more pots downs stairs on the first
level straight ahead and to the left as you enter the museum(or at least
that's what I remember from 3 years ago.) You will get to the top gallery-4
or more HUGE rooms crammed full of pots, and you will never want to leave.
Also, photos are permissible and I took 4 rolls that came out just fine even
through glass. Enjoy. have some bangers and mash and be careful on the
escalators in the Underground.

Other Barb in Bloomington

Darryl Baird & Janet Lorch on fri 30 jul 99

Dorothy and John
I will also be in England the 16th through the 23rd of August. We'll be in there
doing research for a photography workshop my husband will coordinate next summer
but hopefully will have some free time to visit some ceramics galleries and stud
if possible. We'll only be in London for two days, around Bath the remainder of
time. I saw Caroline's post about Contemporary Ceramics, the Craft Potters
Association shop and hope to stop there. I'm sorry I will miss Jane Perryman's w
in the group show which closes on the 7th -- I've been a fan since reading about
her in CM years ago. I know she conducted a workshop this summer but the timing
wasn't right, I would have considered attending. Do you know of any studios that
are open to visiting, or where I can find out about some?

Janet





Date: Wed, 28 Jul 1999 14:37:54 EDT
From: Dorothy Weber
Subject: Re: London galleries

----------------------------Original message----------------------------
We will also be in London the second week in august and have spoken to John
Leach. We will be driving to Somerset to visit his studio staying in a bed
and breakfast he recommended then over to Bath and back to London. I do have
a long list of galleries (not ceramics) that was recommend if anyone is
interested, we are planning to see as many of the ceramics exhibits as
possible.

Have a great trip

Dorothy and John Weber
Manakin-Sabot, Va.

Ravit Birenboim on sun 1 aug 99

Hi Janet.
You will find a list at the Marshall st. store. Just ask whoever is there for
the studios' list.
It was very very disappointing to get to Victoria and Albert and realize that
the modern collection is in the midst of renovation and will be colsed until
Fall 2000!!!
They do have a small and not satisfying samples.
(which means Hans Copper, lucie Rie, Leach and so many other wonderfull
pieces were out of reach.)
The good news are that you can spend at least a week at the British museum
just looking at those amazing greek and roman pot.( I spent three full
days..and took dozens of photographs.)
Enjoy, Ravit

George Koller on sun 1 aug 99


Janet,

I have been communicating with a London tile artist -

dom@crinson.demon.co.uk

for some considerable time. Among other things he is using photographs of cera
images to transfer onto tiles. He has done some large international projects.

I am 3 /12 years into a project to assist in building ceramic artpieces from ima
He has been following my progress for a long time now.

My newest version of the software can read directly from the output of StreamLin
4.0 and produce machine movements to incise / remove glazes to the order of seve
100,000 detail objects. No loss of quality with size (thank you Adobe).

(mel is watching over my shoulders, we have some new ground to break here, lover
photography and ceramics should be able to go just a little crazy.)

Write me off list if this is of some interest?


Best regards,

George Koller
Sturgeon Bay, WI - Door County.

Evan Dresel on tue 3 aug 99

Get a copy of Potters published by Ceramics Review. This is a directory
of fellows and professional members of the Craft Potters Association.
The back contains address & phone info and whether visitors are welcome
at the studios. Aside from that it is a wonderful survey of British
Pottery (no offense to anyone not in the association). Got mine at the
Craft Potters Association shop.

-- Evan in W. Richland WA where the flies are driving the horses bonkers

Darryl Baird & Janet Lorch wrote:
>
> ----------------------------Original message----------------------------
> Dorothy and John
> I will also be in England the 16th through the 23rd of August. We'll be in the
> doing research for a photography workshop my husband will coordinate next summ
> but hopefully will have some free time to visit some ceramics galleries and st
> if possible. We'll only be in London for two days, around Bath the remainder o
> time. I saw Caroline's post about Contemporary Ceramics, the Craft Potters
> Association shop and hope to stop there. I'm sorry I will miss Jane Perryman's
> in the group show which closes on the 7th -- I've been a fan since reading abo
> her in CM years ago. I know she conducted a workshop this summer but the timin
> wasn't right, I would have considered attending. Do you know of any studios th
> are open to visiting, or where I can find out about some?
>
> Janet
>
> Date: Wed, 28 Jul 1999 14:37:54 EDT
> From: Dorothy Weber
> Subject: Re: London galleries
>
> ----------------------------Original message----------------------------
> We will also be in London the second week in august and have spoken to John
> Leach. We will be driving to Somerset to visit his studio staying in a bed
> and breakfast he recommended then over to Bath and back to London. I do have
> a long list of galleries (not ceramics) that was recommend if anyone is
> interested, we are planning to see as many of the ceramics exhibits as
> possible.
>
> Have a great trip
>
> Dorothy and John Weber
> Manakin-Sabot, Va.

Richard Jeffery on sat 6 jan 01


Glad you enjoyed it....

I would drive in London, but not in my car.... Too many professional
drivers about who don't mind risking losing the odd bit of paint and tin to
a passing obstruction. Hire or company car, well maybe. It helps to know
your way, too. It's hard driving on any side of the road with a map held
across the steering wheel, whilst trying to listen to the radio (Jazz FM is
good - and on the internet..) for the next hazard to avoid. London ain't
new - no logic to most of the streets.

I usually drive in, park up and get the tube. Don't ask about parking fees,
it's not pretty....

Richard
Bournemouth UK
www.TheEleventhHour.co.uk


-----Original Message-----
From: Ceramic Arts Discussion List [mailto:CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG]On
Behalf Of Gerry Chichester
Sent: 06 January 2001 17:04
To: CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG
Subject: London

.... My, but youEnglish DO have a variety of hand and finger symbols! I
also became quite adept at lip-reading from those motorists in the
roundabouts who took exception to my Californian driving style!! It wasn't
pretty. I can't imagine ANYONE wanting to attempt downtown London in a car
at ANY time ! And I remember it as such a NICE place!!!! {;>) Have fun,
tho', I love it over there and can't wait to get back this summer!! Carly

__

Gerry Chichester on sat 6 jan 01


I had to pick up on this thread, not because I know London so well, even =
though I didn't live too far away from it many years ago, in lovely =
Ipswich, where I developed my decidedly "Anglophile" heart. But about 4 =
years ago, on my way to the Potters' Festival in Aberystwyth, I landed =
at Heathrow, rented a car - I have no troubles switching right to left - =
and headed for Wales. It took me about 3 hours longer to get where I =
was going because I kept going 'round and round on that damn motorway =
that circles Heathrow!! And the traffic WAS horrendous!! I had my =
hotshot self slapped in place, thinking I wasn't going to have any =
problems; I'm cool, know all the traffic signals, rules, can speed along =
with the best of them( is there actually a speed limit there?!?!) Then =
there are those *@%!!! roundabouts!! I think I was on the way to =
Edinburgh at one point after shooting off the wrong finger of the =
roundabout, and that was after I figured out you have to actuallySTOP =
before entering those devilish British answer to the LA freeways! My, =
but youEnglish DO have a variety of hand and finger symbols! I also =
became quite adept at lip-reading from those motorists in the =
roundabouts who took exception to my Californian driving style!! It =
wasn't pretty. I can't imagine ANYONE wanting to attempt downtown =
London in a car at ANY time ! And I remember it as such a NICE place!!!! =
{;>) Have fun, tho', I love it over there and can't wait to get back =
this summer!! Carly=20

MaryBeth Bishop on sun 7 jan 01


My only addition to what has been said...eat at Cranks. There is one very
near the Marshall St. Potter's Guild shop. I just get a directory, find all
the Cranks, mark them on my map and plan to eat there whenever possible. Try
it. You'll understand. Vegetarian. Wonderful. Happy tummy. Reasonable.
There is one near the theaters as well. Also, no one has told you to pick up
a "Time Out" magazine which will list more entertainments than you can ever
fit in. London is cultural mecca. And you can buy tickets for 1/2 price at
a booth in Leicester Square for theater performances on the day of. Have a
ball. Don't waste time sleeping. Also, go to the New Tate museum if you can
manage it. Walk. Run. See it all.
Cheers,
Mary Beth

Richard Jeffery on mon 8 jan 01


Cranks is great, but remember London now has some of the best restaurants in
Europe, apparently.....

-----Original Message-----
From: Ceramic Arts Discussion List [mailto:CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG]On
Behalf Of MaryBeth Bishop
Sent: 08 January 2001 02:35
To: CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG
Subject: London


My only addition to what has been said...eat at Cranks. There is one very
near the Marshall St. Potter's Guild shop. I just get a directory, find all
the Cranks, mark them on my map and plan to eat there whenever possible.
Try
it. You'll understand. Vegetarian. Wonderful. Happy tummy. Reasonable.
There is one near the theaters as well. Also, no one has told you to pick
up
a "Time Out" magazine which will list more entertainments than you can ever
fit in. London is cultural mecca. And you can buy tickets for 1/2 price at
a booth in Leicester Square for theater performances on the day of. Have a
ball. Don't waste time sleeping. Also, go to the New Tate museum if you
can
manage it. Walk. Run. See it all.
Cheers,
Mary Beth

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Russel Fouts on tue 9 jan 01


Lisa,

They drive on the opposite side of the road in England, Hong Kong, New
Zealand and Australia. I'm sure that's not the end of the list.

In Portugal, at least in the northern mountains where I lived for 2
years, they drive in the middle of the road. I really improves your
driving to learn to drive EXPECTING an enormous truck to come around the
next bend in your lane.

As for London (don't remember who was asking), use the Tube, use the
busses or WALK, much faster, more convenient, less "aggro" then trying
to drive let alone find a parking space in central London.

Before you go, look at the travel sites for places to stay, eat, things
to do, see. They won't have any ceramic related stuff unless there is a
really big important exhibition. Try http://www.timeout.com/london for
starters.

I always stay at a friendly little hotel directly across from the
British Museum called the Ruskin at 23-24 Montague Street. It will cost
you 64 pounds a night for a double room with out connected bath (shower,
toilets down the hall), breakfast included.

You can walk almost anywhere from this location. (Contemporary Ceramics,
Contemporary Applied Arts, Galerie Besson, Bookstores on Charing Cross
Rd, Soho, Oxford Street, Regent Street, National Portrait Gallery,
etc). There are places that are cheaper but I haven't found a better
location at this place.

You'll have to take the Tube to get to the Victoria & Albert Museum,
either of the Tates, the Crafts Council Gallery, the Hart Gallery or the
Camden Market unless you're a REAL walker.

Make your first stop, the Craft Potters Association gallery,
Contemporary Ceramics on Marshall Street (mentioned in other posts) and
pick up a current copy of Ceramic Review. Exhibitions are listed through
out, especially in the back. They can also advise you about where to go,
what to see. Don't forget to look at the pots. It's a pretty good survey
of British Pottery [have donned flame proof underwear at this point].
You'll see a number of clayarters represented including Phil Rogers'
work.

The best deal is that most of the public Museums are free (they ask a
donation). The British Museum has a wonderful exhibition of historical
and contemporary Korean art, including ceramics and a great exhibition
of contemporary Japanese ceramics from the Saga region.

The Ceramics Galleries of the V&A might still be closed for renovation.
I didn't get there last week when I was there so someone else will have
to fill you in.

The Tate Modern was fantastic. What the building itself is extremely
impressive especially if you like Industrial Art Deco. The Galleries
occupy several floors in one half (lengthwise). The other half is a HUGE
cavernous space. It's like being outdoors, while indoors! Oh, yeah, the
art's not too bad either. ;-) Especially the room dedicated to the
Fluxus movement, if you happen to have a ping-pong ball you could play
Fluxus ping-pong.

Eating can be a bit pricy in London. We found a great, little,
reasonably priced, french restaurant called the Savoir Faire, with great
food in large portions on New Oxford st. very near the Ruskin. Another
place for a very reasonably priced meal (again LARGE portions) was the
Cafe EMM in Frith Street off Soho Square.

For after dinner "Sippers" or if Tony Clennell ever gets to London,
there is Milroy's in Greek St (also off Soho Square). Whiskey vendors
since the 1960's, they have over 400 whiskeys in stock with a sampling
bar in the cellar stocked with over 300 whiskeys to sample. Very
friendly people. Everybody at the bar tends to get involved in tasting
and commenting on everybody elses choices. We had a great time!

That ought to keep you busy for a while.

Russel

--


Russel Fouts
Mes Potes et Mes Pots
Brussels, Belgium
Tel: +32 2 223 02 75
Fax: +32 2 210 04 06
Mobile: +32 476 55 38 75
Web: www.mypots.com

Caroline Lewis on wed 10 jan 01


Lots of advice already posted to the person going to London, so I don't have
much to add other than a small moan to those Brit clayarters who took the
opportunity to run down our railway still further. Hey, it's got enough
problems without putting off an foreign visitors as well. To put the record
straight, our railway system has had many problems lately mainly due to
under investment and privatisation. Because of repair schedules this means
trains are running late and in some cases have been cancelled. However, you
CAN still get around and even if it now takes two and a half hours from
London to York (200 miles) instead of just under two, that's still pretty
good in my book.
So please, come and enjoy our beautiful country (though rather cold and
wet). If you are intending using the railway you get very good deals by
booking seven days in advance so if you have a friend in England get them to
book for you. The underground is expensive but much less so if you by a week
or weekend ticket. But the best way to see London is above ground so walk or
use the bus.
Caroline

Janet Kaiser on thu 11 jan 01


Sorry Caroline, but I do not agree. It is unfair
to pretend everything in the garden is rosy,
when it certainly is not.

When giving advice and information to
prospective visitors, we need to be telling them
about the pitfalls as well as the good bits...
They want the TRUTH about conditions, not
platitudes. It is not being unpatriotic or Brit
bashing to warn our friends about certain
problems (however transient or historic in
nature).

We must presume they have already been "sold"
the idea of visiting the country, otherwise they
would not be planning a trip. Many already think
we live in a permanent fog, so if they are lucky
enough to spend a week in continuous sunshine,
it will be a wonderful surprise. If they are
warned about trains not being good at present,
they at least will not be too surprised by
delays if they chose that mode of transport.
They may even hit lucky.

When my cousin visits from New Zealand I do my
level best to inform him of the current
situation. He often still does his own thing...
In 1999, that meant sitting on a bus for ten
hours with his knees under his chin (he is very
tall). It saved him 25 and us from picking him
up from the station in Bangor, but cost a lot of
time (a whole day) on his tight schedule. In
Summer 2000, I advised the train and he got here
in four hours, plus one hour by car. If he was
due here in February, I would advise the bus...
Ten hours is better than up to 16 hours the
trains are currently taking from North Wales to
London, many without heating or on-board
services.

I suggest that we do guests to our country a big
favour by pointing out the difficulties, so they
are well prepared, can make better and more
informed choices and are more able to cope with
an ever-changing situation. We are talking to
friends here and not prospective clients... They
will no doubt appreciate insider knowledge much
more than a hard sell. I would certainly hope
they would do the same for me one day...

As the scouts say: "Be prepared".
And as the saying goes "to be fore-warned, is to
be fore-armed".

For clay art buddies who are planning a visit...
Railtrack (who are currently doing the repairs
to the lines and are responsible for the rail
network the train companies use) have said the
repairs should be finished by Easter 2001. Let
us hope services will return to normal soon
after.

As it happens, fewer overseas visitors are using
the trains, because it is not possible to book
with most operators via the internet. You can
only do so with a UK address.

As everyone already knows, I would not make a
good politician... But, then I believe in being
really straight with people. They may not like
what they hear, but at least they know I am
being honest.

Janet Kaiser
The Chapel of Art . Capel Celfyddyd
HOME OF THE INTERNATIONAL POTTERS' PATH
Criccieth LL52 0EA, GB-Wales Tel: (01766) 523570
E-mail: postbox@the-coa.org.uk
WEBSITE: http://www.the-coa.org.uk

----- Original Message -----

> Lots of advice already posted to the person
going to London, so I don't have
> much to add other than a small moan to those
Brit clayarters who took the
> opportunity to run down our railway still
further.

Martin Howard on fri 12 jan 01


Well said Janet.
What I cannot understand is why visitors head straight for the capital and
stay there.
So many of my Polish friends have done that they have made their own Polish
village in London, and rarely go outside.

For potters there are few things to see in London. A day or two at most.
Then get outside and visit the potters of your selected area.
Visit the Potteries in Staffordshire. That needs more than a day or two.

Our airports, except for Heathrow, are out of town. So why visit the area
around that point first, rather than head straight for the expensive hotels,
grime, dust and crowds of central London?

We only go to London when it is essential. Hardly ever for pleasure. There
are plenty of good rural theatres and even some worthwhile museums. And one
day at a time is sufficient.

To study various rare earths and their suitability for inclusion in bodies
or glazes I might spend the day in London at the Natural History and
Geological Museum. But I hardly think that visitors on holiday from the
States will want to do that.

But then my comments are made against the background of having been a Town
Planner for 40 years, mainly trying to get the rural areas functioning
properly and using the local materials in building.

Martin Howard
Webb's Cottage Pottery
Woolpits Road, Great Saling
BRAINTREE, Essex CM7 5DZ
England
martin@webbscottage.co.uk

Naomi Rieder on sat 11 aug 01


I'm going to be in London for 2-3 days during the first week of October and
would appreciate hearing-off list-from any Clayarters who could suggest
where to stay: inexpensive, but not inconvenient?. Also, are there any
Clayarters in London doing unglazed sawdust firing? If yes, I'd love to see
your work.

MTIA,

Naomi Rieder
naomirdr@aol

Earl Brunner on tue 11 mar 08


OK, so next week I will be in London for Spring Break. What are the best choices pottery wise if I don't have much time?

Earl Brunner
Las Vegas, NV

Marcia Selsor on tue 11 mar 08


Victoria and Albert Museum, British Museum, and look up the British
Crafts guilds showrooms.
V & A has Leach pots and a teapot exhibit, Islamic tiles, etc, etc,
etc.
British Museum has enough Greek pots displayed it looks like a
warehouse.
Have a great time. I love all the Indian restaurants in London. We
don't have a single one here.
Also if you like theater, I think it is the Prince Albert theater
ticket office sells "off Broadway" = Fringe Theater
same day performances and Leicester Sq. sells last minute seats for
the legit theater discounted.

Marcia

Marcia Selsor
http://marciaselsor.com

Susan Fox Hirschmann on tue 11 mar 08


There is a wonderful British Pottery shop, that you simply must see. Thanks
to clayart, I met up with a potter from there, and we did the town together!
It was grand fun! From the Tate Modern to beyond....
I cannot remember the section of London --that this pottery shop is
located....but the guide books may help you...I merely remember it being a couple of
blocks from Liberty of London....I was there in March of 2005. The British
Museum is a MUST....INCREDIBLE exhibits there! and if you can do a train trip to
BAth, you will not be disappointed.

Best of luck,
Susan Fox-Hirschmann
Annandale, VA



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Katie Ellis on tue 11 mar 08


The sixth floor of the Victoria and Albert Museum, hands down. Hamada,
Leach, Cardew, Soldner, Rie, Coper, the list goes on and on of the ceramic
gods whose presence graces the top floor of that museum. I visited there in
2003 when I graduated from high school, and I revisit the memory as often as
I can. :) I'll never forget my dad yelling across the empty room to me,
"Gee, that Hamada guy wasn't that great, Kate! He couldn't even get his
rims even!" Oh Dad. I was less than a year old in clay years then, and was
very much in love with Lucie Rie, so I mostly just stood and stared at her
pots...I wish I could go back now and walk around some more! I think I only
saw (or paid attention to) 10% of everything they had up there. I know
better now!!

Enjoy your trip to London!!

-Katie at BYU

Susan Fox Hirschmann on wed 12 mar 08


In a message dated 3/12/2008 9:57:08 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
pat@SOUTHWOOD4.FSNET.CO.UK writes:

> There is a wonderful British Pottery shop, that you simply must see. >
Susan, you mean "Contemporary Ceramics" The gallery/shop of The Craft
Potters Association of Britain.
Fauberts Place, turn left off Carnaby St, nearest tube, Oxford Circus.
Enjoy.
Pat Southwood.

YEP!! That is the ONE! A MUST SEE!
Susan Fox-Hirschmann
Annandale, VA



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Pat Southwood on wed 12 mar 08


> There is a wonderful British Pottery shop, that you simply must see. >
Susan, you mean "Contemporary Ceramics" The gallery/shop of The Craft
Potters Association of Britain.
Fauberts Place, turn left off Carnaby St, nearest tube, Oxford Circus.
Enjoy.
Pat Southwood.

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Jason Hooper on wed 12 mar 08


Susan Fox Hirschmann wrote:
> There is a wonderful British Pottery shop, that you simply must see.

This is the Craft Potters Association Gallery:
http://www.cpaceramics.com/howto.html
- definitely worth a look.

The Victoria and Albert ceramics collection was closed last time I was
there because of some targeted thefts from the collection. However there
is plenty of pottery in the other geographical areas of the museum -
Britain, China, Japan, Middle East etc. They were doing one guided tour
of the ceramics collection once a month by appointment only - you might
want to give them a call to see if this coincides with your trip.

--
Jason Hooper
http://www.jjhooper.com

Jenny Lewis on wed 12 mar 08


Hi Earl

As the others have already said, LOTS to see in London. If you don't have
much time, then definitely:

British Museum - lots of pots in almost every section, ancient Greece, Rome, Egypt,
and China. Also, at the moment they have an exhibition of the terracotta soldiers
(not all of them!) but you have to book in advance.

V&A - fabulous pots but the ceramics galleries are closed for refurbishment
until next year. However, there is still much to see on the ground floor -
China, Japan, Korea, Islamic arts, plus other galleries around the museum.

The pottery shop is in Marshall Street, nearest tube Oxford Circus or
Piccadilly Circus. LOTS of pottery and books, definitely worth a visit.
Also, just near it is a really good Indian Restaurant, the Masala Zone,
good food, not too expensive.

Contemporary Applied Arts, 2 Percy Street, just off Tottenham Court Road -
all crafts, good selection of books. Nice place. Near to Charlotte Street
which has lots of restaurants.

So, that's your first morning taken care of, what on earth will you do for
the rest of the day?

Have a great time.

Jenny Lewis
Londoner really
but now living in Eastleigh
which is not too far away



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Ruth Ballou on wed 12 mar 08


Favorite London haunts:

British Museum.... I'd live there if I could. Follow the pots back
through time. I think the Chinese Terra Cotta Soldiers are still
there. You can get tickets the day of if you get there early.
Craft Potters Shop on Marshall Street, near Carnaby Street. This is
the shop of the Craft Potters Association. Nice Indian restaurant next
door.
Contemporary Applied Arts on Percy St., just off Tottenham Court Rd.
Pots are downstairs.
Galerie Besson, now showing Yasuhisa Kohyama. 15 Royal Arcade at 28
Bond St. It's tucked away, well worth the visit.

Unfortunately, the studio ceramics floor at the top of the V&A is
still closed for renovation. But there are some fine Japanese, Chinese
and Korean pots on the first floor.

Non pottery places if you have the time....More art that you can shake
a stick at
Tate Modern --- the building alone is worth a look see

National Gallery ---- some of everything
National Portrait Gallery


On Mar 11, 2008, at 9:17 AM, Earl Brunner wrote:

> OK, so next week I will be in London for Spring Break. What are the
> best choices pottery wise if I don't have much time?
>
> Earl Brunner
> Las Vegas, NV
>
> ______________________________________________________________________________
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Russel Fouts on fri 14 mar 08


I didn't see the original post so I don't know whom I'm talking to.

London is really one of the best places in the world to look at pots!

>> The Victoria and Albert ceramics collection was closed last time I was
there because of some targeted thefts from the collection. <<

That was the rumor but thefts or not, the ceramic halls were way
overdue for renovation of the presentation systems and security. This
was from the curator of studio ceramics.

Best museum, bar none for looking at crafts in general in the world.

http://www.vam.ac.uk/

>> However there is plenty of pottery in the other geographical
areas of the museum -
Britain, China, Japan, Middle East etc. They were doing one guided
tour of the ceramics collection once a month by appointment only -
you might want to give them a call to see if this coincides with your trip. <<

Give them a call but I think this has stopped as well.

The ceramic halls will be open to the public sometime in 2009.

Other places to look at ceramics and crafts

When you get there go to the CPA Gallery (Contemprary Ceramics) and
pick up a copy of Ceramic Review to get a bead on what's happening.

Percival David Foundation has a wonderful collection of chinese ceramics.

Contemporary Applied Arts has great general craft

Joanna Bird (appointment only) has a nice collection of old and new
studio pottery

Adrian Sassoon (appointment only) has a nice collection of contempory craft

The Craft Council, if they've finished their renovations have great
shows of craft and a terrific image library.

The Hart Gallery shows pots and paintings.

Galerie Besson (open only on weekdays!) has some of the best
contemporary and not so contemporary ceramics and sometimes other crafts.

Barrett Marsden Gallery often has ceramics

The Anthony Shaw Collection (by appointment) has a terrific
collection of british studio pottery. This was the man's private
collection, shown in his house.

The kitchen ware shop at John Lewis in Oxford street often has
interesting pottery; Ruper Spira, Maiolica Works, etc. And now they
FINALLY take credit cards.

The Harlquin gallery, in greenwich, has pottery by japanese and
japanese oriented potters (Phil Rogers, Mike Dodd, etc)

And while you're over there go visit Lisa Hammond's studio in Maze
Hill. She's been making great salt glazed functional ware for a long
time and since working in Japan, is making some fantastic one off
pots experimenting with shinos and soda firing.

Also go visit Yo Thom's studio in Hackney (+44 774 850 6910) if you
can catch her in. She's a young japanese woman who studied with Lisa
but has a wonderful style all her own.

The people at Contemporary Ceramics can probably connect you with
other London potters if you want to visit studios. There are a lot of
really great people working in London.

If you are coming before the 6th of April you can still see the
"First Emperor" show of the terra-cotta soldiers at the British
museum. Not to be missed.

Remember that museum entrances are free. They ask for a donation but
what you give (or not) is up to you.

All of the above have websites so get searching.

Enjoy

Russel



Russel Fouts
Mes Potes & Mes Pots
Brussels, Belgium
Tel: +32 2 223 02 75
Mobile: +32 476 55 38 75

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