search  current discussion  categories  materials - copper 

copper melting point

updated mon 29 oct 01

 

Ann Brink on thu 25 oct 01


Paul, I've never tried it on the side of a pot, but have used fine gauge
wire to form designs on plates, just laying the wire on the glazed surface.
You get a green line, sometimes a broken line because as the wire melts, it
separates. If you embed it in the clay, you might avoid breaks in the line.
Where the copper oversaturates the glaze, you'll have black areas.

The melting point is 1983 degrees F. by the way.

And if you lay a penny on a shelf, thinking it will make a nice rounded
puddle---well, it will eat a hole right into the shelf and exhude green
forever. (That was during my early years in pottery (:-).

Ann Brink in CA


----- Original Message -----
From: "Paul Ringo"
To:
Sent: Thursday, October 25, 2001 4:04 PM
Subject: Copper melting point


I'm considering embedding some copper wire into the side of a pot to create
some texture and an image. I've never seen this done and have no idea
whether it will work or not so I'm interested in suggestions (including
forget it if appropriate). Anybody every tried this will very small gauge
copper wire? Anybody know the actual melting point of copper? Will the
clay try to seal it off? Will the copper drip or run? Firing temp
suggestions would also be useful. Thanks from a REAL newbie.

Paul Ringo, Lake Charles, La.

____________________________________________________________________________
__
Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org

You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/

Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
melpots@pclink.com.

GlassyClass on thu 25 oct 01


Hello Paul,

Something I read once on a glaze page, which I found useful, not only for
what it said also for something else, was find a table of elements. Copper
is a element. CU

http://www.webelements.com/webelements/elements/text/Cu/key.html


http://www.chemicalelements.com/elements/cu.html
Name: Copper
Symbol: Cu
Atomic Number: 29
Atomic Mass: 63.546 amu
Melting Point: 1083.0 C (1356.15 K, 1981.4 F)
Boiling Point: 2567.0 C (2840.15 K, 4652.6 F)
Number of Protons/Electrons: 29
Number of Neutrons: 35
Classification: Transition Metal
Crystal Structure: Cubic
Density @ 293 K: 8.96 g/cm3
Color: red/orange

http://www.chemsoc.org/viselements/
Very cool one.

Bud





----- Original Message -----
From: "Paul Ringo"
Sent: Thursday, October 25, 2001 4:04 PM
Subject: Copper melting point


I'm considering embedding some copper wire into the side of a pot to create
some texture and an image. I've never seen this done and have no idea
whether it will work or not so I'm interested in suggestions (including
forget it if appropriate). Anybody every tried this will very small gauge
copper wire? Anybody know the actual melting point of copper? Will the
clay try to seal it off? Will the copper drip or run? Firing temp
suggestions would also be useful. Thanks from a REAL newbie.

Paul Ringo, Lake Charles, La.

tomsawyer on thu 25 oct 01


Ann/Paul,
I had an old friend who was a machinist and he would save me all of his
copper shavings. When placed in a clear glaze that I used, I would get nice
green streaking in oxidation and red in reduction; the shavings were very
fine and after putting them in the glaze, I would just brush them on the
pot.
Tom Sawyer
tsawyer@cfl.rr.com

Paul Ringo on thu 25 oct 01


I'm considering embedding some copper wire into the side of a pot to =
create some texture and an image. I've never seen this done and have no =
idea whether it will work or not so I'm interested in suggestions =
(including forget it if appropriate). Anybody every tried this will =
very small gauge copper wire? Anybody know the actual melting point of =
copper? Will the clay try to seal it off? Will the copper drip or run? =
Firing temp suggestions would also be useful. Thanks from a REAL =
newbie.

Paul Ringo, Lake Charles, La. =20

Richard Jeffery on fri 26 oct 01


it will melt at raku temps if it is thin enough - haven't worked out actual
melting point, but there are some clues in the archive if you hunt around.
There was a potter near here who used thicker copper wire in raku - that
ended up embedded, but kept its form. Experiment!

I also use scraps of thin brass sheet, and the silver filings from my wife's
jewellery bench....

Richard
Bournemouth UK
www.TheEleventhHour.co.uk


-----Original Message-----
From: Ceramic Arts Discussion List [mailto:CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG]On
Behalf Of Paul Ringo
Sent: 26 October 2001 00:05
To: CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG
Subject: Copper melting point


I'm considering embedding some copper wire into the side of a pot to create
some texture and an image. I've never seen this done and have no idea
whether it will work or not so I'm interested in suggestions (including
forget it if appropriate). Anybody every tried this will very small gauge
copper wire? Anybody know the actual melting point of copper? Will the
clay try to seal it off? Will the copper drip or run? Firing temp
suggestions would also be useful. Thanks from a REAL newbie.

Paul Ringo, Lake Charles, La.

____________________________________________________________________________
__
Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org

You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/

Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
melpots@pclink.com.

Snail Scott on fri 26 oct 01


At 06:04 PM 10/25/01 -0500, you wrote:
>I'm considering embedding some copper wire...
>Anybody know the actual melting point of copper?
>Will the copper drip or run?...


Copper melts at about 1900 F. At lower temperatures,
it turns black. (See the work of Liz Anderson) If you
cover it with glaze, it will depend a lot on the size
of your wire how much will enter the glaze melt, but it
might be interesting. Maybe some greens or reds.

If you want it to look like copper wire, perhaps try
putting grooves in the clay, and lay the wire in afterward.

Some people take on the notion that it's not 'real'
ceramics if the whole piece didn't come out of the
kiln in its final form. (I heard a lot of that in
school..."Purity of Process"...)

Phooey!

There's lots of terrific post-firing modifications you
can make to your claywork. Don't be restricted by what
processes will survive firing!

Functional ware has its own requirements for durability
of surfaces as well as toxicity issues, but if the
piece is intended to be decorative, there are many,
many possibilities for incorporating metal and other
materials with your clay.
-Snail

Clayhannie@AOL.COM on sat 27 oct 01


Years ago, I fired copper wire in a spiral on the outside of wind bells that
I was making. I glazed the form, then wound wire around on top of the glaze.
My experience was that the wire melted, broke apart, and most fell to the
shelf. The pieces that did manage to melt into the glaze were mostly black,
as there was not enough glaze to flux the wire. The part that fell on the
shelf melted into the shelf and rendered it forever green.
When I imbedded the wire into the clay, it burned into the clay as black
copper oxide, no color.
Martha Griffith

Fay & Ralph Loewenthal on sun 28 oct 01


Paul, I have used small copper balls (.25" diameter), that I=20
got from a copper mine, on a Raku piece. They melted=20
and sort of slid down the pot. I have seen copper wire
being out round pit fired fumed pots and the effect was
really lovely. I guess if you do not go up to high the=20
copper wire should work. Hope this helps Ralph in Cape
Town.