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4-gauge copper wire

updated thu 7 nov 02

 

Kristin on tue 5 nov 02


Hi all -- I'm a lurker who randomly posts sometimes.
Just trying to set up my studio in the middle of
Illinois, where it's hard to find anything that I need
(of course).

My electrician is attempting to find 4-gauge copper
wire to get power from my box to my garage, which will
be about a 45-foot stretch.

But he can't find it anywhere. He says the only way we
can do it is to put a bunch of wires together
ourselves and put it in conduit? (Sorry, I know
nothing about this electrician gook.)

My trusty kiln repair fellow back in Colorado says
that six will probably be fine, as long as I don't go
above 50 feet. But the manufacturer, Cress, gave me
the standard "You have to use 4-gauge, I can't say if
6-gauge would work or not" answer.

This is a Cone 6 jobbie, 7 cubic feet, 45 amp, 10.8
watts, 240 volts (specifically, it's a Cress B27H,
about 16 years old, only been fired 4 times).

Does anyone have any advice -- either using 6-gauge,
or finding 4-gauge? He's been looking for about a
month now, and is really trying to convince me to just
go 6. I'm nervous, but don't know if I should be or
not.

Thanks, everyone. I'll go back to my little wheel now
and keep throwing, trimming, throwing, trimming,
building my little stockpile until one day the poor
little kiln in my garage gets some juice.

- Kristin

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Philip Poburka on tue 5 nov 02


Well, what I do when some 'professional' tell me he or she
cannot 'find' something as is needed for what I was (maybe)
going to hire them to do...

I get on the 'phone myself, call supply houses, ask
questions and see if I can find it.

Usually I can...maybe allways...or very close to 'allways'.

If not finding it in town, then out of town, or out of
State.

If a given supplier does not have it...ask them where they
would go if they needed it...in your case, you could also
talk with older Electrical contractors too, see if they have
a partial coil laying around as they would get off of.

Also Scrap dealers, recyclers...'copper' is familiar to
them...


And then too, once looking, or finding...usually, I start to
wonder why I was thinking of hireing someone who could not
or would not) find it...afterr all, was it not within their
'profession' to do so?

You could try that...

Good luck!

Phil
las Vegas

----- Original Message -----
From: "Kristin"
To:
Sent: Tuesday, November 05, 2002 6:52 AM
Subject: 4-gauge copper wire


Hi all -- I'm a lurker who randomly posts sometimes.
Just trying to set up my studio in the middle of
Illinois, where it's hard to find anything that I need
(of course).

My electrician is attempting to find 4-gauge copper
wire to get power from my box to my garage, which will
be about a 45-foot stretch.

But he can't find it anywhere. He says the only way we
can do it is to put a bunch of wires together
ourselves and put it in conduit? (Sorry, I know
nothing about this electrician gook.)

My trusty kiln repair fellow back in Colorado says
that six will probably be fine, as long as I don't go
above 50 feet. But the manufacturer, Cress, gave me
the standard "You have to use 4-gauge, I can't say if
6-gauge would work or not" answer.

This is a Cone 6 jobbie, 7 cubic feet, 45 amp, 10.8
watts, 240 volts (specifically, it's a Cress B27H,
about 16 years old, only been fired 4 times).

Does anyone have any advice -- either using 6-gauge,
or finding 4-gauge? He's been looking for about a
month now, and is really trying to convince me to just
go 6. I'm nervous, but don't know if I should be or
not.

Thanks, everyone. I'll go back to my little wheel now
and keep throwing, trimming, throwing, trimming,
building my little stockpile until one day the poor
little kiln in my garage gets some juice.

- Kristin

__________________________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
HotJobs - Search new jobs daily now
http://hotjobs.yahoo.com/

____________________________________________________________
__________________
Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org

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Bruce Girrell on tue 5 nov 02


> My electrician is attempting to find 4-gauge copper
> wire to get power from my box to my garage, which will
> be about a 45-foot stretch.
> This is a Cone 6 jobbie, 7 cubic feet, 45 amp, 10.8
> watts, 240 volts (specifically, it's a Cress B27H,
> about 16 years old, only been fired 4 times).


The ampacity* of #4 wire is 70 amps and the ampacity of #6 is 55 amps.
Technically, #6 would do the job, but that 45 ft. run is pushing things.
Without a doubt, #4 would be the preferred choice.

Lacking #4 wire you could double up #8. The ampacity of doubled #8 would be
80 amps. To be strictly within the National Electrical Code, you would have
to run two conduits (or side-by-side burials) with three conductors each.
Keep the system balanced by running hot leg A, hot leg B and neutral in each
group rather than, say two hot leg A and one neutral in one group and two
hot leg B and the other neutral in the other group. If you choose to go with
direct burial, make sure that your wire has insulation that is rated for
direct burial (type RUW, for example).

Bruce "electric personality" Girrell



*Ampacity is the current carrying capability of the wire. This rating
assumes that the conductors are rated at 60 C (140 F) with not more than
three conductors in a raceway or direct burial. This is the standard rating.
For example, when you hear that #14 is good for 15 amps and #12 is good for
20 amps, the same assumptions are made.

Alan Lent Sr. on tue 5 nov 02


Kristen,

Have your electrician go to Home Depot, Lowes, etc. and pick up some
"Underground Service" cable in 4/4 or 2/4. The first number (4/) is the
size of wire - second number(/4) is number of wires in cable. If he uses
Underground Service cable he won"t have to run the cable through a pipe
unless he really wants to since the cable is meant to be buried "as is".
You will need four wire cable to properly install a 50 amp receptacle for
your kiln power cord or even to hard wire it properly.

Best of luck,
Alan in Yuma where it is getting cool
high of 80 deg today



----- Original Message -----
From: "Kristin"
To:
Sent: Tuesday, November 05, 2002 7:52 AM
Subject: 4-gauge copper wire


> Hi all -- I'm a lurker who randomly posts sometimes.
> Just trying to set up my studio in the middle of
> Illinois, where it's hard to find anything that I need
> (of course).
>
> My electrician is attempting to find 4-gauge copper
> wire to get power from my box to my garage, which will
> be about a 45-foot stretch.
>
> But he can't find it anywhere. He says the only way we
> can do it is to put a bunch of wires together
> ourselves and put it in conduit? (Sorry, I know
> nothing about this electrician gook.)
>
> My trusty kiln repair fellow back in Colorado says
> that six will probably be fine, as long as I don't go
> above 50 feet. But the manufacturer, Cress, gave me
> the standard "You have to use 4-gauge, I can't say if
> 6-gauge would work or not" answer.
>
> This is a Cone 6 jobbie, 7 cubic feet, 45 amp, 10.8
> watts, 240 volts (specifically, it's a Cress B27H,
> about 16 years old, only been fired 4 times).
>
> Does anyone have any advice -- either using 6-gauge,
> or finding 4-gauge? He's been looking for about a
> month now, and is really trying to convince me to just
> go 6. I'm nervous, but don't know if I should be or
> not.
>
> Thanks, everyone. I'll go back to my little wheel now
> and keep throwing, trimming, throwing, trimming,
> building my little stockpile until one day the poor
> little kiln in my garage gets some juice.
>
> - Kristin
>
> __________________________________________________
> Do you Yahoo!?
> HotJobs - Search new jobs daily now
> http://hotjobs.yahoo.com/
>
>
____________________________________________________________________________
__
> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
melpots@pclink.com.
>

Ditmar on tue 5 nov 02


If he says he's an electrician... and can't find 4 ga. wire. Personally I
think it's time for a new electrician.
If the extra cost won't be a serious problem, you can always go larger. 3ga
or 2 ga. wire.
Ditmar
----- Original Message -----
From: "Kristin"
To:
Sent: Tuesday, November 05, 2002 4:52 AM
Subject: 4-gauge copper wire


> Hi all -- I'm a lurker who randomly posts sometimes.
> Just trying to set up my studio in the middle of
> Illinois, where it's hard to find anything that I need
> (of course).
>
> My electrician is attempting to find 4-gauge copper
> wire to get power from my box to my garage, which will
> be about a 45-foot stretch.
>
> But he can't find it anywhere. He says the only way we
> can do it is to put a bunch of wires together
> ourselves and put it in conduit? (Sorry, I know
> nothing about this electrician gook.)
melpots@pclink.com.
>
>

Snail Scott on tue 5 nov 02


At 06:52 AM 11/5/02 -0800, you wrote:
>
>My electrician is attempting to find 4-gauge copper
>wire to get power from my box to my garage, which will
>be about a 45-foot stretch.
>But he can't find it anywhere... He says the only way we
>can do it is to put a bunch of wires together
>ourselves and put it in conduit?


My kiln is wired with 4-gauge, for a run of about
35' from the breaker to the kiln. I found the 4-
wire cable in outdoor-OK plastic sheathing at both
Lowe's and Home Despot in the electrical aisle.
Pricey, but very handy. No conduit needed. My
kiln in a 48 amp critter, similar to yours, and
according to my electrical-fixit-person's math,
6-gauge is pushing it, at 45' from the breaker.
Hold out for 4-gauge - if it's obtainable here in
Reno, it's probably obtainable in most of the US.


-Snail

Ilene Richardson on tue 5 nov 02


Can you order this giant fat wire online at Lowes.com? They have all
that stuff. Its expensive about $1.75 per foot.
Ilene

Mike on wed 6 nov 02


I agree with first sentance. You can look at a 6-3 with ground UF-B cable.
this is direct burial and should be readily available. Now this is rated at
55 amps and a 45 foot run at 45 amps is a .8% voltage drop, or 1.9 volts
drop at 240 volt. This should cause no problems. If you want to use direct
burial #4 and cant find it, I can get you a piece and have it shipped to
you. Email me direct.

Mike
mjacks@adelphia.net

-----Original Message-----
From: Ceramic Arts Discussion List [mailto:CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG]On
Behalf Of Ditmar
Sent: Tuesday, November 05, 2002 5:59 PM
To: CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG
Subject: Re: 4-gauge copper wire


If he says he's an electrician... and can't find 4 ga. wire. Personally I
think it's time for a new electrician.
If the extra cost won't be a serious problem, you can always go larger. 3ga
or 2 ga. wire.
Ditmar
----- Original Message -----
From: "Kristin"
To:
Sent: Tuesday, November 05, 2002 4:52 AM
Subject: 4-gauge copper wire


> Hi all -- I'm a lurker who randomly posts sometimes.
> Just trying to set up my studio in the middle of
> Illinois, where it's hard to find anything that I need
> (of course).
>
> My electrician is attempting to find 4-gauge copper
> wire to get power from my box to my garage, which will
> be about a 45-foot stretch.
>
> But he can't find it anywhere. He says the only way we
> can do it is to put a bunch of wires together
> ourselves and put it in conduit? (Sorry, I know
> nothing about this electrician gook.)
melpots@pclink.com.
>
>

____________________________________________________________________________
__
Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org

You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/

Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
melpots@pclink.com.