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wood burners of the world, ignite!

updated tue 10 aug 04

 

Marta Matray Gloviczki on thu 5 aug 04


taylor,
you should really go to the woodfiring conference in september.
you probably could get all the answers for your questions there,
and much much more.
i could bring you some dr.pepper....
:-)
marta
=====
marta matray gloviczki
rochester,mn

http://www.angelfire.com/mn2/marta/
http://users.skynet.be/russel.fouts/Marta.htm
http://www.silverhawk.com/crafts/gloviczki/welcome.html

taylor wrote;
>............
>I am ready to find a place where I can build some kilns and fire some
>pots. As some of you may know, my hope is to build a wood kiln or two.
>Here is where all you experienced pyros come in. We are looking at
>properties suitable for such activities but are worried about all the
>hidden issues associated with building and firing such kilns.
>
>Put your heads together and tell me what and who should I be asking
>about these things? What kinds of things do I need to be taking into
>consideration when looking at properties? As always, thanks for any and
>all help.
>
>Now back to packing up all those little pieces of clay trimmings and odd
>bits of metal, plastic, and wood.
>
>Taylor, in not long for Waco
>
>___________________________________________________________________________
___
>Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
>You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
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>
>Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
melpots@pclink.com.

Merrie Boerner on thu 5 aug 04


Hi
Taylor.
I have been watching you.
Don't blurt out your intentions to the public......there will always be
someone to object if you ask......just get on with your plans.
My woodburning kiln gets too much ash in 35 hours....I get too much ash
?......big name folks can't figure out how drippy ash on the bottoms of pots
would be a problem, because that is what some desire...to me it means
grinding and the consumers don't understand or appreciate wad marks....hey,
I AM in Mississippi.
I have fired my easy to get hot kiln 23 times in 5 years. My taste has
changed. I want more subtle ash affects and calmer firings...not so hot....a
result from firing with Jack Troy..... We got it at my last firing. I would
enjoy talking seriously about your endeavors.
Merrie/Kickasswoodfiringwoman/mississippiqueen


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Hendrix, Taylor J. on thu 5 aug 04


Howdy y'all:

There is no longer any denying it: we are moving south to Rockport, TX.
David Hendley knows, but I had to tell him. He's my priest.

Seven years of detritus fills the garage and I am in charge of boxing
all that up. Sigh. I have already packed all pottery materials,
wheels, tools, and ware and have only to pack up the kilns. That will be
interesting.

I am ready to find a place where I can build some kilns and fire some
pots. As some of you may know, my hope is to build a wood kiln or two.
Here is where all you experienced pyros come in. We are looking at
properties suitable for such activities but are worried about all the
hidden issues associated with building and firing such kilns.

Put your heads together and tell me what and who should I be asking
about these things? What kinds of things do I need to be taking into
consideration when looking at properties? As always, thanks for any and
all help.

Now back to packing up all those little pieces of clay trimmings and odd
bits of metal, plastic, and wood.

Taylor, in not long for Waco

Craig Edwards on sat 7 aug 04


Taylor: Find some property near a saw mill and /or clay pit. Simple but
hard to do. Close to a good market for your pots is nice.
The neighbors are the biggest factor the I've always encountered.
Sometimes it's best to ask for forgiveness than permission. However I've
always gone through the proper zoning channels and in the long run it
has worked out for the best.
I bought 13 acres about a mile outside of town( in the township) to
build a kiln on. The township board approved the application to build
the kiln. At the county zoning board hearing, one of the neighbors was
dead set against the kiln. he was the kind of person who is against
everything, a person you don't want for the guy next door. The zoning
board saw nothing wrong with with the kiln. However, I didn't want to
build a kiln next to an asshole. I bought the property in 1997 and was
able to sell it in1999 for more than twice what I'd paid! I grin
everytime, I think of Gordy the asshole.
I looked around and found a much better situation. All legal and great
neighbors that think having a woodfired kiln is OK.
Good luck on your search.
Cheers
~Craig Edwards
New London MN


Hendrix, Taylor J. wrote:

>Howdy y'all:
>
>There is no longer any denying it: we are moving south to Rockport, TX.
>David Hendley knows, but I had to tell him. He's my priest.
>
>Seven years of detritus fills the garage and I am in charge of boxing
>all that up. Sigh. I have already packed all pottery materials,
>wheels, tools, and ware and have only to pack up the kilns. That will be
>interesting.
>
>I am ready to find a place where I can build some kilns and fire some
>pots. As some of you may know, my hope is to build a wood kiln or two.
>Here is where all you experienced pyros come in. We are looking at
>properties suitable for such activities but are worried about all the
>hidden issues associated with building and firing such kilns.
>
>Put your heads together and tell me what and who should I be asking
>about these things? What kinds of things do I need to be taking into
>consideration when looking at properties? As always, thanks for any and
>all help.
>
>Now back to packing up all those little pieces of clay trimmings and odd
>bits of metal, plastic, and wood.
>
>Taylor, in not long for Waco
>
>______________________________________________________________________________
>Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
>You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
>settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
>Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at melpots@pclink.com.
>
>
>

Lee Love on sat 7 aug 04


Merrie Boerner wrote:

> I have fired my easy to get hot kiln 23 times in 5 years. My taste has
>changed. I want more subtle ash affects and calmer firings..
>

I am with you. I like to touch pots and not just look at them.

--
Lee in Mashiko, Japan http://mashiko.org
http://www.livejournal.com/users/togeika/ WEB LOG
http://public.fotki.com/togeika/ Photos!

Lee Love on mon 9 aug 04


Merrie Boerner wrote:

> I have fired my easy to get hot kiln 23 times in 5 years. My taste has
>changed. I want more subtle ash affects and calmer firings...not so hot....a
>result from firing with Jack Troy..... We got it at my last firing. I would
>enjoy talking seriously about your endeavors.
>Merrie/Kickasswoodfiringwoman/mississippiqueen
>
Merrie, I am of the same mind. It is funny how folks seem to
stereotype woodfired work. There is as much or more variety in
woodfiring as any other type of work. When someone here was
complaining about brown wood fired pots, I lined up a row of 4
different kinds of blue that my teacher gets out of his noborigama.
I'll put photos up sometime.

But too, surface and texture comes in all sorts. Some
of the crusty work that we American woodfirers try to achieve were
accidents when done by the old Chinese and Japanese potters. Accidents
they'd try to avoid if they had the technical ability that we have to do
so. Often, when we actively pursue these kinds of effects, they come
out forced or pretentious. Hamada would call these pots
"Tasty." A friend from another list helped me find a Ryokan quote:

"Ry˘kan declared there were three things he disliked:
poet's poetry,
calligrapher's calligraphy,
chef's cooking."


My many visitors this summer has helped me figure out the
direction of my work. The summer has helped me think about the pots I
like best and has steered me back in that direction. It is one
reason why this kiln load is half full of glaze tests.

I finally lit the fire this morning!

--
Lee in Mashiko, Japan http://mashiko.org
http://www.livejournal.com/users/togeika/ WEB LOG
http://public.fotki.com/togeika/ Photos!