search  current discussion  categories  techniques - slips 

paper resist, slips and ashes

updated sun 6 feb 05

 

Eva Gallagher on wed 2 feb 05


Hi Kelly - I fire to cone 6 but wish I was wood firing so spray or sprinkle
on wood ash. Depending on what glaze you have underneath it will give you
great effects- may run a bit, may matt up up bit. You can also spray a thin
coat of transparent over the ash at the very end to help melt the ash. Also
spray some rutile/gerstley borate or add also iron to it to help vary the
ash effect.Titianium added to this is also good. Doesn't end up looking like
wood but at least it's not boring electric.
Eva Gallagher
Deep River, Ontario
----- Original Message -----
From: "primalmommy"
To:
Sent: Wednesday, February 02, 2005 1:02 PM
Subject: Paper resist, slips and ashes


> All inspired by Tony and Sheila, I have been goofing around with paper
> resist and slips. I have zero experience with slips, and am wondering if
> it is even worthwhile for somebody firing at ^6 ox. He also talked about
> sprinkling wood ash on the pots -- again, would this be pointless under
> ^8? I suspect so, but there are always people who have made themselves
> the exception to the rule.
>
> I am open to any ideas, experiments or assignments with ^6, slips,
> translucent glazes and/or ash.
>
> Yours again
> Kelly in Ohio
>
>
>

> style="font-size:13.5px">_______________________________________________________________
Get
> the FREE email that has everyone talking at > href=http://www.mail2world.com
> target=new>http://www.mail2world.com


> 250MB & 2GB Email Accounts - POP3 - Calendar - SMS -
> Translator - Much More!

>

>
> ______________________________________________________________________________
> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
> melpots@pclink.com.


primalmommy on wed 2 feb 05


All inspired by Tony and Sheila, I have been goofing around with paper
resist and slips. I have zero experience with slips, and am wondering if
it is even worthwhile for somebody firing at ^6 ox. He also talked about
sprinkling wood ash on the pots -- again, would this be pointless under
^8? I suspect so, but there are always people who have made themselves
the exception to the rule.

I am open to any ideas, experiments or assignments with ^6, slips,
translucent glazes and/or ash.

Yours again
Kelly in Ohio


_______________________________________________________________
Get the FREE email that has everyone talking at http://www.mail2world.com

250MB & 2GB Email Accounts POP3 Calendar SMS Translator - Much More!


Jan Goodland Metz on thu 3 feb 05


Kelly wrote:
All inspired by Tony and Sheila, I have been goofing around with paper
resist and slips. I have zero experience with slips, and am wondering if
it is even worthwhile for somebody firing at ^6 ox. He also talked about
sprinkling wood ash on the pots -- again, would this be pointless under
^8? I suspect so, but there are always people who have made themselves
the exception to the rule.

I am open to any ideas, experiments or assignments with ^6, slips,
translucent glazes and/or ash.

Yours again
Kelly in Ohio


Hi Kelly, I've been looking back through old Ceramics Monthlies that a kind
friend passed on to me and last night I came across cone 5-6 slip glazes (30 of
them) that looked really interesting. Including ash glazes. It is in the
October 1983, page 63-4, by Gerald Rowan. If you can't find it. I will be
happy to make a copy and send your way.

It made me want to try cone 6

(I need to get an electric kiln to bisque in, I spent an hour trying to pull a
sled with a box full of work to my friends studio in snow up to my
thighs....found out that snow sticks right onto leather hard pots that fall
into the snow and sort of eats its way in, you can't brush it off, makes a
texture. It was a reallly dumb thing to do...so I've been thinking about
electric cone 6, and buy the kiln to bisque at home.)


(I haven't tried this) Here is an ash glaze for c6 oxidation:

Wood Ash (unwashed)50%
Any transparent Gloss Glaze 50%

For the following color variations add:
3% Chrome Oxide...green
1% Cobalt Oxide...blue
3% Red Iron Oxide...tan
5% Rutile...Opaque

Jan
potting in Rhode Island

John Hesselberth on thu 3 feb 05


On Wednesday, February 2, 2005, at 09:00 PM, Eva Gallagher wrote:

> but at least it's not boring electric

Hi Eva,

I''m wondering what you mean by boring electric. I don't find electric
fired glazes boring at all. They can be just as exiting and beautiful
as glazes fired any other way. You just have to learn how to formulate,
apply, and fire them.

Regards,

John

Elizabeth Priddy on fri 4 feb 05


regarding boring electric glazes.

I'ld definitely say that boring is as boring does and has little to do with the firing technique.

I have seen some of the most boring surfaces ever come out of wood fired and gas fired
kilns. It is like looking through Vogue.

"Yes, yes, very beautiful, skinny, blonde, boring."

Interesting surfaces have to have something unique about them. Tony mentioned slips. It is
good advice, there has to be something going on besides the standard beautiful wood or
gas look.

A potter that lives nearby makes the same pots he made in 1970. So do a few thousand other
potters who use the same technique. There is nothing going on that would make me want
to aprentice under him, nothing.

Gas and wood and electric are only as boring as the potters who use them.



Elizabeth Priddy

252-504-2622
1273 Hwy 101
Beaufort, NC 28516
http://www.elizabethpriddy.com

---------------------------------
Do you Yahoo!?
Yahoo! Mail - Easier than ever with enhanced search. Learn more.

Eva Gallagher on fri 4 feb 05


Hi John,
I guess that I should not have said boring - it's just no matter what you
do - and yes I have your book - tried slow cooling and that helps greatly -
here is still nothing that has the depth and variation of a reduction fired
kiln to cone 10. I guess part of that is the reduced clay body. Even cone
8-10 electric helps rather than cone 6 as the glazes seem to meld with the
body more somehow.
Yes you can get spectacular results in an electric but they are different
and do not look like high fire reduction. I just prefer the high fire
reduction. So until I get my wood kiln I will keep on sprinkling on ash,
rutile, soda ash etc. in an attempt to get that look. Haven't got there yet
:)
Eva

----- Original Message -----
From: "John Hesselberth"
To:
Sent: Thursday, February 03, 2005 7:07 PM
Subject: Re: Paper resist, slips and ashes


> On Wednesday, February 2, 2005, at 09:00 PM, Eva Gallagher wrote:
>
>> but at least it's not boring electric
>
> Hi Eva,
>
> I''m wondering what you mean by boring electric. I don't find electric
> fired glazes boring at all. They can be just as exiting and beautiful
> as glazes fired any other way. You just have to learn how to formulate,
> apply, and fire them.
>
> Regards,
>
> John
>
> ______________________________________________________________________________
> Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
> You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
> settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
> Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at
> melpots@pclink.com.

Kathy McDonald on fri 4 feb 05


Kelly wrote:
All inspired by Tony and Sheila, I have been goofing around with paper
resist and slips. I have zero experience with slips, and am wondering if
it is even worthwhile for somebody firing at ^6 ox. He also talked about
sprinkling wood ash on the pots -- again, would this be pointless under
^8? I suspect so, but there are always people who have made themselves
the exception to the rule.

I am open to any ideas, experiments or assignments with ^6, slips,
translucent glazes and/or ash.

Yours again
Kelly in Ohio

Kelly if you have access to Ravenscrag slip it is great at cone 6
with different colorants added under a clear glaze.

I noticed others have posted some recipies.

Kathy




--
No virus found in this outgoing message.
Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
Version: 7.0.300 / Virus Database: 265.8.5 - Release Date: 2/3/2005

Lee Love on sat 5 feb 05


primalmommy wrote:

>t
>sprinkling wood ash on the pots -- again, would this be pointless under
>^8? I suspect so, but there are always people who have made themselves
>the exception to the rule.
>
>
Hi PM,
The "original" slipware was lowfired ware. Slips can
certainly be used with them. I would expect this to be covered in any
thorough cone six glaze book..

Brush them, trail them, inlay them, scraffito them. The
possibilities are endless. Actually, many of the national treasure
pieces in Japan may not have reached cone 6. The character you see in
the glazes are sometimes due to underfiring. What I noticed in my
teacher's noborigama, was that the nuka glaze would only have the same
soft character as Hamada's nukas, on student ware that was placed in the
colder part of the kiln.

The last thing I experimented with in electric was cone 6
ash glazes over slip glaze (Alberta substitutions for Albany slip.)
The slip glaze percolates up into the ash glaze and creates variation
that you normally associate with higher fire ware. This is one of the
ways I would work if I were firing electric, along with majolica and
boro-lithium lead-like glazes.

If you want to try dusting pots with wood ash, make sure you
have a softer glaze and not a matt glaze, so the ash can depend upon the
glaze for some fluxing. Use a softwood ash and sieve it so you are
only using small particles. Apply the ash by sieving it and letting
the ash fall through the sieve onto the still wet glaze. Don't wash
the ash, because the solubles have fluxes in them.

This is probably how the first pots were glazed, being
dusted with woodash.

--
in Mashiko, Japan http://mashiko.org
http://www.livejournal.com/users/togeika/ WEB LOG
http://public.fotki.com/togeika/ Photos!