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interesting math.

updated sun 9 apr 06

 

primalmommy on thu 6 apr 06


OK, so while I was mopping the guild after class tonight, I did some
mental math.

My babysitter makes $6 an hour. It's the standard rate. Her job is: to
keep my children alive, answer the phone and eat my food.

By coincidence, the parents whose kids take my clay class also pay $6 an
hour to leave their kids with me.

My job is: to teach ten kids how to throw pots on ten wheels,
simultaneously.

Oh, and to care for the greyish-green little girl who keeps saying she
is going to barf, and call her parents to learn that they are much too
busy to come and pick her up.

Then run from wheel to wheel, helping kids center, open, pull, saying
"anchor that elbow! Left hand! Slow down that wheel! Elbow down! Too
wet! Too dry!"

Then send my autistic student to the bathroom to clean up because he is
misusing the wheel. His mother says he is overstimulated by things that
spin (And you signed him up for pottery because.?)

Clean up his wheel for him, and return to teaching the other nine until
he fills a bucket with water and dumps it on the bathroom floor because
- he says - he wants to mop.

Negotiate a full fledged, foot-stomping, you-can't-make-me tantrum
during which he declares that he does not WANT to make pots. I am
already aware of this. In fact, I explained it to his mother at the end
of the previous ten week session, when I pointed out that I have no
aides and can't give her son the extra attention he needs without
neglecting my other 9 students. She smiled and signed him up again. (Did
I mention babysitters cost $6 an hour?)

Set him up in the guild kitchen, with a board and some clay and a
rolling pin, make some handbuilding suggestions.

Return to my class, where I run from wheel to wheel like a demented
chicken, squawking, "Elbows! Elbows! and diagnosing what pots died of.

Ignore the remarkable sound of angry student in the kitchen hammering a
lump of clay with a rolling pin on a metal countertop.

Remind kids that the first hour of class is over, and they should keep
an eye on the clock and finish their projects while allowing time to
clean up - unlike the last class, where I found the sink full of
abandoned muddy tools, bats and buckets.

Bolt to the kitchen, convinced by white billowing clouds that
something's on fire -- to find my autistic student pounding his board on
the industrial dust-catching rug on the floor, raising a thick smog of
silica dust. Flail through the cloud, opening windows and doors to air
the place out. Confiscate board. Search pockets for my asthma inhaler,
which I apparently left at home.

Find a jacket for grey-green child, who is now shivering.

Wrap finished pots and put them on shelves.

Remind the girl whose mother always forgets to pick her up to call her
mother.

Remind the kids to sign their bats, wire off their pots, start cleaning
up their wheels.

Sponge wheels, scrape up clay globs, wave goodbye to parents who pick up
their kids - and kids who have left me a sink full of muddy tools, bats
and buckets.

Shelve the 25 pound clay bags too big for little kids to lift.

Wait with the one kid whose parents are always late, until long after my
dinnertime.

Mop the whole guild, especially the well-dusted kitchen, the
bucket-spattered bathroom and the tangle of cords behind 10 wheels where
all the globs have interesting tennis-shoe prints in them.


So back to math. Of the $12 per class parents pay, $4 goes for clay,
expenses and the guild. That leaves me $8 per kid. I arrive for the two
hour class early, since some parents just drop a kid off at the empty
building and drive away. And even if kids are picked up on time, (which
is rare) I stay after to clean and mop, wipe wedging boards, and make
the place presentable for guild members.

Never mind evenings and weekends loading and unloading kilns, washing
towels, carrying hundreds of pounds of clay down (and later up) the
basement steps, updating and printing registration forms, processing
payments, mixing glazes, and fielding phone calls. Just counting class
time, I make less than $3 per hour per kid

So - ten kids, thirty bucks, right?

This is the funny part: thirty bucks is exactly what I charge per hour
for a private lesson - one quiet, well-behaved, hand-selected child at a
time, dropped off in my driveway to make pots in my backyard studio. And
I don't have to mop unless I feel like it.

Or pay the babysitter. Did I mention she makes $6 an hour?

Yours
Kelly in Ohio

seriously thinking about renegotiating my contract.















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Earl Brunner on thu 6 apr 06


And you do this WHY?
Tell the autistic kids mom NO. (unless she provides a
helper)
Charge for babysitting, for late pickups- they don't
pay, don't let them re-enlist.

Earl Brunner
Las Vegas, NV
-----Original Message-----
From: Clayart [mailto:CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG] On
Behalf Of primalmommy
Sent: Thursday, April 06, 2006 9:21 PM
To: CLAYART@LSV.CERAMICS.ORG
Subject: Interesting math.


Yours
Kelly in Ohio

seriously thinking about renegotiating my contract.















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earlk on thu 6 apr 06


On Thu, 2006-04-06 at 21:20 -0700, primalmommy wrote:
> So - ten kids, thirty bucks, right? ...

Oh, but P-mommy, the're such cute little darlin's !!!!

Did I ever tell you about when I was a kid? One day on
the school bus the neighbor kid puke'd right in the
pocket of my new big heavy winter coat. The rest of
that winter and all of the next I never stuck my hand
in that coat pocket; mittens always went into the other.
I was sooooo happy to outgrow that coat !

earlk...
bothell, wa, usa

Who's greatest achievment in near 12 lustrums of living
is being able to say that he's never, ever, changed a diaper.
Not that this duty was relegated to the wife, but because
there were never any little ones around that required
this onerous ministration.

Chuck Wagoner on fri 7 apr 06


Dear Kelly, (And you are!)

After twenty years of teaching art in a public school I know how
frustrating it can be. My classes regularly top 25 and right now I run
over 140 kids through the art room a day. Somewhere in between all of
that bad stuff there are some moments that resonate in a special way.

You sound like a wonderful teacher, they are lucky to have you. While
you may be feeling like it is a wash, you may just have touched some of
these "tough cases" in ways you don't know. I can't take kids out of
class that should not be in there, but I think you should be able to in
your situation. You deserve better pay and some help from the parents
and your admin. I should think you get paid by the amount of students in
class. Hourly no less then 20.00 for what you are doing.

I for one am ready to write a letter in your regard! Just tell me where
to send it.

Potter Wagoner in Rockville, IN

Elizabeth Priddy on fri 7 apr 06


I didn't teach kids for 17 years with the fire of burnout
as close to my butt as you!

You are doing a lot of work that just is NOT YOUR JOB !

Where are the administrators of this facility?

I had a waiting list for children at the centers I taught. I chose
to work with parks and rec offices and centers, not potters guilds.

Guilds are good for adults, Parks and Rec offices will hire you
to expand their "programming" to do the same thing. And the
parents do not care who is sponsoring the class.

In parks and Rec:

Kids who are banned from group classes DO NOT GET signed up.
Period. If she wants your full attention for her kid, you negotiate
that outside of standard class. In that context, you might even
like this kid.

Class for children should last 1 and a half hours. It takes them
1/4 hour to get situated and working and to settle down after a
usually over-scheduled day. They can work for about an hour before
even the most steadfast tire of ANY task. And then they have a full
1/4 hour to stop and clean up. Means wheels off except for cleaning
at one hour mark. Wheels are not done and kid is not released from
class until his bucket and tools are sitting on his wheel with the cord
wrapped around the base. These busy (abusive) parents only have to
come in ONE time to get Johny after helping him understand what he
has to do to continue pottery class and all of a sudden he can clean on
time. Wow...a lesson in personal responsibility AND a pottery class
for the same money! This is in writing on the registration form and is
signed by the parent and the child. You need a new form.

And a proper administrative support system. You are too important
an element to get eaten up and burned out. And yes, Parks and Rec
takes some of the cash and you get paid about two weeks in instead
of on the first day. But they charge more and you factor your pay cycle
into your life. It is worth it.

You sound like such a conscientious person with regard to the needs
of everybody around you and everyone you serve. Always. You need to
turn that tender eye toward yourself if this endeavor is going to be sustainable.

The email that started this is a resignation letter. You just might not
see it that way...yet. Perhaps you can hire an administrator on a
commission basis, a point man to make guild classes work better
for YOU. Some people call this person an apprentice. or assistant.
or pottery slave, who does it in exchange for their guild dues and fees
and all the clay they can throw and is shared by others who teach
with you. You can find a way, and I am sure you will.

Two cents from a long term kids class lover. NOT an administrator.
And Parks and Rec kept me supplied with kids all year and as many
sessions as I would do. My local P&R director has my number and
if the class my associate took over for me when I had the boy gets too
burnt out or too busy with other things...I just might get back to it. You
make me miss those loud and disturbingly chaotic rooms of children...
or is that play group tomorrow morning? Oh yeah, I have a day job for the
next three years...

Good luck and try to schedule a nap with your husband, no kids allowed.
Sometimes you just need to get paid...or whatever.

E





primalmommy wrote:
.....

.....She smiled and signed him up again. (Did
I mention babysitters cost $6 an hour?)

... where I found the sink full of
abandoned muddy tools, bats and buckets.

....
Remind the kids to sign their bats, wire off their pots, start cleaning
up their wheels.
....
Mop the whole guild, especially the well-dusted kitchen, the
bucket-spattered bathroom and the tangle of cords behind 10 wheels where
all the globs have interesting tennis-shoe prints in them.

...
updating and printing registration forms, processing
payments,... and fielding phone calls.


....This is the funny part: thirty bucks is exactly what I charge per hour
for a private lesson - one quiet, well-behaved, hand-selected child at a
time, dropped off in my driveway to make pots in my backyard studio. And
I don't have to mop unless I feel like it.

Yours
Kelly in Ohio

seriously thinking about renegotiating my contract.
















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Elizabeth Priddy

Beaufort, NC - USA
http://www.elizabethpriddy.com

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William & Susan Schran User on fri 7 apr 06


On 4/7/06 12:20 AM, "primalmommy" wrote:

> seriously thinking about renegotiating my contract.

I'm sure most folks that teach pottery at any age level and at any venue
share most of the issues you wrote about. Many of the things you brought up
I face in a community college situation where we have an open door policy.
Cleaning up after the slobs is certainly a never-ending battle. Dealing with
young adults/late teens that have gone off their meds or unresponsive
parents who force their mentally/socially challenged children to take an art
class for art therapy or to socialize them present a problem in large
classes where the teacher can't provide necessary individual attention and
is not trained to interact with individuals with special needs presents
another set of challenges.

Last year I had a young adult (23 years old) with High Functioning Asbergers
Syndrome - here's some information:
http://www.caer.com/asbergers%20syndrome.htm and suffered from severe OCD.
Her mother was doing all she could to socialize her daughter because she
realized she would not be around forever to watch over her.
The three of us met before enrolling her daughter in the class and I talked
with the mother frequently on the phone. Her daughter had a difficult time
interacting with others in the class, but fortunately I had her describe her
symptoms of the disease with the class, which was very helpful, but she was
still difficult some days to control. She tried very hard, but often could
not focus on the task at hand. In the end, after many discussions with her
mother, we decided that working with clay was not her thing. She did create
some very outstanding line drawings with complicated repetition &
patterning, but she couldn't make the leap to 3D modeling. I helped her find
a tutor for one-on-one instruction with doing art on the computer, which she
seems to really enjoy doing.

Don't know how much sway you hold with the powers that be, but there
certainly should be some provision in the "rules" when parents sign their
kids up for a community based art class about disruptive students and
students that are ill. Perhaps you could make some suggestions to the
"contract" between the parents and the guild.


-- William "Bill" Schran
Fredericksburg, Virginia
wschran@cox.net
wschran@nvcc.edu

Craig Clark on fri 7 apr 06


Kelly, after settling down (I've been in one of those if it sounds
really painful it's better to laugh than cry fits after reading your
post) I have a few suggestions. First and foremost the Guild must
establish unyielding rules about who is eligible to take a class, the
drop off and pick up times, and penalties for breaking the rules.
Every group, and mean every single what that I have been associated
with whose mission it is to educate children have discovered that left
to their own devices many parents will abuse the system. At the very
least they will have a plethora of reasons of why they were "just a
little late" to pick up their little darlings. On the other end of the
scale are the folks who either dont care or are so exhausted that they
will leave "behaivorally challenged" or special needs children in the
care of others without much concern for the result.
First, the easiest, are the inconsiderate parents who are late. Just
impose a stiff financial penalty of one dollar per minute. The folks at
the Methodist Day Care who watch my youngest daughter a few days a week
impose this type of tariff and guess what......folks find some way to
pick up their children on time. It's amazing what a little financial
insentive, especially when it's to the tune of $60/hour for child care,
will motivate people to do. Works great! Also, when parents sign their
children up have them sign a contract spelling out in specific detail
classroom discipline and that unrully or disruptive children will not be
permitted to return nor will there be a refund of class money if such
disciplinary actions are necessary. Both the child and the parent need
to sign this basic commitment. There is no reason for a disruptive child
to ruin the experience for all of the other kids.
In the case of the special needs children, not only are you being
taken advantage of by the parent and the guild, there is the additional
problem of being properly trained to deal with the exceptionally
difficult issues an autistic child faces. The parent either doesn't have
a clue, is exhausted beyond description, or there may be a combo of the
two going on. My sister has been teaching autistic children for a number
of years now. It is difficult at best and requres extensive resources
and the assistance of professionally trained and qualified folks which
the Guild probably doesnt have.
Anyway, hope it works out..
Sounds like the kids are generally pretty good...
Use the monetary wrench to your advantage with the inconsiderate
parents, it the only thing that will work. Even if it doesn't your
getting $60/hour for your time at that point!
Hope this helps
Craig Dunn Clark
619 East 11 1/2 St
Houston, Texas 77008
(713)861-2083
mudman@hal-pc.org

primalmommy wrote:

>OK, so while I was mopping the guild after class tonight, I did some
>mental math.
>
>My babysitter makes $6 an hour. It's the standard rate. Her job is: to
>keep my children alive, answer the phone and eat my food.
>
>By coincidence, the parents whose kids take my clay class also pay $6 an
>hour to leave their kids with me.
>
>My job is: to teach ten kids how to throw pots on ten wheels,
>simultaneously.
>
>Oh, and to care for the greyish-green little girl who keeps saying she
>is going to barf, and call her parents to learn that they are much too
>busy to come and pick her up.
>
>Then run from wheel to wheel, helping kids center, open, pull, saying
>"anchor that elbow! Left hand! Slow down that wheel! Elbow down! Too
>wet! Too dry!"
>
>Then send my autistic student to the bathroom to clean up because he is
>misusing the wheel. His mother says he is overstimulated by things that
>spin (And you signed him up for pottery because.?)
>
>Clean up his wheel for him, and return to teaching the other nine until
>he fills a bucket with water and dumps it on the bathroom floor because
>- he says - he wants to mop.
>
>Negotiate a full fledged, foot-stomping, you-can't-make-me tantrum
>during which he declares that he does not WANT to make pots. I am
>already aware of this. In fact, I explained it to his mother at the end
>of the previous ten week session, when I pointed out that I have no
>aides and can't give her son the extra attention he needs without
>neglecting my other 9 students. She smiled and signed him up again. (Did
>I mention babysitters cost $6 an hour?)
>
>Set him up in the guild kitchen, with a board and some clay and a
>rolling pin, make some handbuilding suggestions.
>
>Return to my class, where I run from wheel to wheel like a demented
>chicken, squawking, "Elbows! Elbows! and diagnosing what pots died of.
>
>Ignore the remarkable sound of angry student in the kitchen hammering a
>lump of clay with a rolling pin on a metal countertop.
>
>Remind kids that the first hour of class is over, and they should keep
>an eye on the clock and finish their projects while allowing time to
>clean up - unlike the last class, where I found the sink full of
>abandoned muddy tools, bats and buckets.
>
>Bolt to the kitchen, convinced by white billowing clouds that
>something's on fire -- to find my autistic student pounding his board on
>the industrial dust-catching rug on the floor, raising a thick smog of
>silica dust. Flail through the cloud, opening windows and doors to air
>the place out. Confiscate board. Search pockets for my asthma inhaler,
>which I apparently left at home.
>
>Find a jacket for grey-green child, who is now shivering.
>
>Wrap finished pots and put them on shelves.
>
>Remind the girl whose mother always forgets to pick her up to call her
>mother.
>
>Remind the kids to sign their bats, wire off their pots, start cleaning
>up their wheels.
>
>Sponge wheels, scrape up clay globs, wave goodbye to parents who pick up
>their kids - and kids who have left me a sink full of muddy tools, bats
>and buckets.
>
>Shelve the 25 pound clay bags too big for little kids to lift.
>
>Wait with the one kid whose parents are always late, until long after my
>dinnertime.
>
>Mop the whole guild, especially the well-dusted kitchen, the
>bucket-spattered bathroom and the tangle of cords behind 10 wheels where
>all the globs have interesting tennis-shoe prints in them.
>
>
>So back to math. Of the $12 per class parents pay, $4 goes for clay,
>expenses and the guild. That leaves me $8 per kid. I arrive for the two
>hour class early, since some parents just drop a kid off at the empty
>building and drive away. And even if kids are picked up on time, (which
>is rare) I stay after to clean and mop, wipe wedging boards, and make
>the place presentable for guild members.
>
>Never mind evenings and weekends loading and unloading kilns, washing
>towels, carrying hundreds of pounds of clay down (and later up) the
>basement steps, updating and printing registration forms, processing
>payments, mixing glazes, and fielding phone calls. Just counting class
>time, I make less than $3 per hour per kid
>
>So - ten kids, thirty bucks, right?
>
>This is the funny part: thirty bucks is exactly what I charge per hour
>for a private lesson - one quiet, well-behaved, hand-selected child at a
>time, dropped off in my driveway to make pots in my backyard studio. And
>I don't have to mop unless I feel like it.
>
>Or pay the babysitter. Did I mention she makes $6 an hour?
>
>Yours
>Kelly in Ohio
>
>seriously thinking about renegotiating my contract.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>

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>
>______________________________________________________________________________
>Send postings to clayart@lsv.ceramics.org
>
>You may look at the archives for the list or change your subscription
>settings from http://www.ceramics.org/clayart/
>
>Moderator of the list is Mel Jacobson who may be reached at melpots@pclink.com.
>
>
>


katetiler on fri 7 apr 06


In my house we have an expression for jobs like that:

"Cheaper to stand at the top of the driveway and hand out =A35 notes for
half an hour."

It's my reminder why I don't trade at craft fairs, but I'll let you
borrow it on this occasion :)

I love your writings by the way!

Karen - katetiler
http://www.katetiler.co.uk

Rob on fri 7 apr 06


Yowza.

Now I feel guilty.

I have four students of varying ages from 10 to 45. I teach them for three
hours a week for $27 an hour, and someone else does the mopping.
Furthermore, the art center supplies the clay, and the advanced students
fight over who gets to load and unload the kilns.

Kelly, I am SO sorry. Renegotiate. And lower the boom on a couple of the
parents, too. Your time had GOT to be worth more than that, especially with
that kind of hassle.

Robert Van Rens
Knoxville, MD

"Oh bother," said the Borg. "We've assimiated Winnie the
Pooh."

First they came for the Objectivists, and I didn't speak up,
because I wasn't an Objectivist.

Then they came for the WASPs, and I didn't speak up,
because I wasn't a WASP.

Then they came for the bloody Statisticians,
and not before time, either.

----- Original Message -----
From: "primalmommy"
To:
Sent: Friday, April 07, 2006 12:20 AM
Subject: Interesting math.


> OK, so while I was mopping the guild after class tonight, I did some
> mental math.
>
> My babysitter makes $6 an hour. It's the standard rate. Her job is: to
> keep my children alive, answer the phone and eat my food.
>
> By coincidence, the parents whose kids take my clay class also pay $6 an
> hour to leave their kids with me.
>
> My job is: to teach ten kids how to throw pots on ten wheels,
> simultaneously.
>
> Oh, and to care for the greyish-green little girl who keeps saying she
> is going to barf, and call her parents to learn that they are much too
> busy to come and pick her up.
>
> Then run from wheel to wheel, helping kids center, open, pull, saying
> "anchor that elbow! Left hand! Slow down that wheel! Elbow down! Too
> wet! Too dry!"
>
> Then send my autistic student to the bathroom to clean up because he is
> misusing the wheel. His mother says he is overstimulated by things that
> spin (And you signed him up for pottery because.?)
>
> Clean up his wheel for him, and return to teaching the other nine until
> he fills a bucket with water and dumps it on the bathroom floor because
> - he says - he wants to mop.
>
> Negotiate a full fledged, foot-stomping, you-can't-make-me tantrum
> during which he declares that he does not WANT to make pots. I am
> already aware of this. In fact, I explained it to his mother at the end
> of the previous ten week session, when I pointed out that I have no
> aides and can't give her son the extra attention he needs without
> neglecting my other 9 students. She smiled and signed him up again. (Did
> I mention babysitters cost $6 an hour?)
>
> Set him up in the guild kitchen, with a board and some clay and a
> rolling pin, make some handbuilding suggestions.
>
> Return to my class, where I run from wheel to wheel like a demented
> chicken, squawking, "Elbows! Elbows! and diagnosing what pots died of.
>
> Ignore the remarkable sound of angry student in the kitchen hammering a
> lump of clay with a rolling pin on a metal countertop.
>
> Remind kids that the first hour of class is over, and they should keep
> an eye on the clock and finish their projects while allowing time to
> clean up - unlike the last class, where I found the sink full of
> abandoned muddy tools, bats and buckets.
>
> Bolt to the kitchen, convinced by white billowing clouds that
> something's on fire -- to find my autistic student pounding his board on
> the industrial dust-catching rug on the floor, raising a thick smog of
> silica dust. Flail through the cloud, opening windows and doors to air
> the place out. Confiscate board. Search pockets for my asthma inhaler,
> which I apparently left at home.
>
> Find a jacket for grey-green child, who is now shivering.
>
> Wrap finished pots and put them on shelves.
>
> Remind the girl whose mother always forgets to pick her up to call her
> mother.
>
> Remind the kids to sign their bats, wire off their pots, start cleaning
> up their wheels.
>
> Sponge wheels, scrape up clay globs, wave goodbye to parents who pick up
> their kids - and kids who have left me a sink full of muddy tools, bats
> and buckets.
>
> Shelve the 25 pound clay bags too big for little kids to lift.
>
> Wait with the one kid whose parents are always late, until long after my
> dinnertime.
>
> Mop the whole guild, especially the well-dusted kitchen, the
> bucket-spattered bathroom and the tangle of cords behind 10 wheels where
> all the globs have interesting tennis-shoe prints in them.
>
>
> So back to math. Of the $12 per class parents pay, $4 goes for clay,
> expenses and the guild. That leaves me $8 per kid. I arrive for the two
> hour class early, since some parents just drop a kid off at the empty
> building and drive away. And even if kids are picked up on time, (which
> is rare) I stay after to clean and mop, wipe wedging boards, and make
> the place presentable for guild members.
>
> Never mind evenings and weekends loading and unloading kilns, washing
> towels, carrying hundreds of pounds of clay down (and later up) the
> basement steps, updating and printing registration forms, processing
> payments, mixing glazes, and fielding phone calls. Just counting class
> time, I make less than $3 per hour per kid
>
> So - ten kids, thirty bucks, right?
>
> This is the funny part: thirty bucks is exactly what I charge per hour
> for a private lesson - one quiet, well-behaved, hand-selected child at a
> time, dropped off in my driveway to make pots in my backyard studio. And
> I don't have to mop unless I feel like it.
>
> Or pay the babysitter. Did I mention she makes $6 an hour?
>
> Yours
> Kelly in Ohio
>
> seriously thinking about renegotiating my contract.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>

> style="font-size:13.5px">_______________________________________________________________
Get
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Pam Cresswell on fri 7 apr 06


Wow, Kelly, I wish you were at my guild so I could get in on the cheap child
care for my autistic son :-)
I cannot afford to pay for a care giver who is experienced with autistics,
and your typical sitter is scared of the whole idea, but luckily my young
man is (almost) never a problem and is too old for a sitter now anyway.
A couple of years back, I signed him up for a class at my guild, as well as
myself (to be his aide), but only after I spoke with the instructor, and
made sure she was comfortable with the idea. We completed a 4 week intro
class together, but he was not interested in continuing. He doesn't like the
feel of getting dirty, it is a tactile thing. I would not dream of using a
class as a place to drop him off. I do not remember what I paid, but it was
more than $6 per hour, and I paid double, since I was hanging out too.
I would be very firm with the parent, if they insist he remain in a class he
doesn't want to be in, they need to stay, or supply an aide of some sort. My
son has a speech therapist/social coach, who goes with him to places and
helps him interact. A class like yours would be a great therapy setting for
him, but not with you being the therapist, you have enough to do :-)
Pam in KC where the fruit trees are beautiful but the pollen is horrible

Taylor Hendrix on sat 8 apr 06


Hey Kelly,

Elizabeth is sooooooo right. Time management is an important skill=20
to master teaching those ages. Barb F. and I taught handbuilding and
the better days were the days when we had clear, definite tasks for
them to do. We had fun didn't we, Barb? I was so happy when Barb's
daughter came to help.

Clean up was a class event and by golly they all cleaned up their own
tools and places. hehe, made my after-class clean up that much
easier. They at least knocked down the big piles of clay for me.

Filling up 2 hours of class time is more challenging the younger your
students. Can you believe I survived classes with some 1st graders?!=20
Oy.

Taylor, in Rockport TX

On 4/7/06, Elizabeth Priddy wrote:
> I didn't teach kids for 17 years with the fire of burnout
> as close to my butt as you!
>
> You are doing a lot of work that just is NOT YOUR JOB !