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tea pot directly on burner ok?

updated sun 16 apr 06

 

Mary Adams on wed 12 apr 06


When you make a tea pot (or any other piece of pottery I guess) that will go
directly on a burner , are there special instructions (special clay, create
a ring that might go between the burner and the piece? prepare the bottom
some way???)

m

Marcia Selsor on wed 12 apr 06


On Apr 12, 2006, at 9:03 AM, Mary Adams wrote:

> When you make a tea pot (or any other piece of pottery I guess)
> that will go
> directly on a burner , are there special instructions (special
> clay, create
> a ring that might go between the burner and the piece? prepare the
> bottom
> some way???)
>
> m
>
Dear Mary,
You would need "flameware" for direct contact with a burner or a low
tech porrous earthenware.
A kettle is for boiling water and a teapot is for steeping and
serving tea.
I always remember this phrase:
"Take the pot to the kettle, not the kettle to the pot". This avoids
scalding folks by carrying
a kettle of boiling water to the teapot.
Good lesson.
Marcia Selsor
http://marciaselsor.com

Daniel Semler on wed 12 apr 06


Hi Mary,

Flameware (stuff that gets flamed :)) is not a straightforward thing to
design. Yes it does need a special claybody and so on. The problem stems from
body formulation and the heating that will occur. The thermal expansion
characteristics of fired ceramics can lead to failure when heated rapidly or
unevenly. Bodies can be designed to do this of course but I've not personally
done it.

Ovenware is a little easier I think as there are ways to stack the
deck - like
fill it with cold (room temp - or thereabouts) and then heat the whole
lot from
a source that is more even and slower.

Thanx
D

Tony Ferguson on thu 13 apr 06


Mary,

Just say no. Do not put your teapot directly on the burner. Unless you have developed (and I mean really developed and tested with every conceivable possible use and temperature variable, condition, etc) it is unwise to put any claybody on a burner. Even developing your own flameware is a recipe for potential disaster--someone getting hurt and someone suing you for everything you have worked for. Now that said it isn't impossible. When I was in Korea, they had some fantastic flameware that was used commonly in the homes. It worked fine. So, it can be done. I use a copper/stainless steel water kettle that I bring to just under a boil that I pour into my teapot. One thing that some folks do is to warm the teapot with hot water before you pour the hot water into the teapot from the kettle. I believe this is so the otherwise room temp teapot does not rob the water of its heat.

Tony Ferguson

Mary Adams wrote:
When you make a tea pot (or any other piece of pottery I guess) that will go
directly on a burner , are there special instructions (special clay, create
a ring that might go between the burner and the piece? prepare the bottom
some way???)

m

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Susanne Notenboom on fri 14 apr 06


Hai mary,

My experience is that when i make a teapot and fired it above 1220 degrees
C.It goes well. But there is a space between the flame and the teapot and
never put it on the tealight when it is not filled with tea.

Then the teapot can crack. I make my work onely in the stoneware
categorie...

I also make chocolate fondue's and they don,t crack. Come and take a look
at

www.suuskeramiek.com
(english version is not yet ready but there are some chocalate fondue's)

Janet Kaiser @ The Chapel of Art on sat 15 apr 06


Oh dear! I think some are talking at cross-purposes here! And I suspect the=
resounding "no!" "never" I want to shout will not be welcome. So before I=
do... Just to clarify... What did the original questioner mean by=
"burner". (A) a gentle candle-fed flame for keeping pots hot once the tea=
has been made (B) the spirit-lamp type flame used for fondues and=
therefore somewhat hotter than a mere candle or (C) the direct heat from a=
gas/electric stove used to boil water in kettles and pans?

For (A) there should be no problem with any well made pot. Once the tea has=
been made with boiling water from a kettle or pan it can sit over a flame=
or two quite happily. If you can make tea in the traditional way, then you=
can place any pot on a "st=F6vchen" (as we call them in Germany). The=
usual rules of care naturally apply even with this "minimal" heat source.

For (B) there could be a problem if the lamp is lit at "full" with little=
liquid in the tea pot and/or a cold pot is put directly over the flame,=
even if the body is able to withstand thermal shock in the normal course=
of things. On the whole as long as it is a "keeping warm" rather than a=
"cooking" flame, all with be well. If the distance of the pot from the=
flame means that there is direct heat onto the surface, then the spirit=
lamp must either be turned very low indeed and/or the distance from the=
flame should be increased just to make sure that the pot does not overheat=
in one small area.

But if you meant (C) all along, then it is *extremely* difficult to achieve=
for various reasons. And all those many reasons are why ceramic tea pots=
are filled with boiling water. The water is NEVER brought to the boil or=
boiled in the ceramic tea pot. It is one of those "not done" things for=
the simple reason that it would be dangerous.

There are naturally exceptions, but even the "primitive" pots which will=
sit happily beside a wood fire will not withstand the equivalent of a blow=
torch being directed at one point or part. For most daily situations,=
makers guarantee their hand-made ceramic pots will withstand the heat of=
boiling water as they will any "keeping warm" set up, but they CANNOT=
guarantee their ware will withstand the extreme of a gas burner or=
electric plate.

It is a very serious safety issue... If a pot full of hot liquid shatters=
on an open fire outdoors it would probably not cause injury or damage and=
even if it did, that society would be aware of the risks and not wish to=
sue the maker if the consequences were injurious.

Our society does not work that way! As a rule of thumb, it is best to look=
at the "traditional" use of most ceramic vessels and take it from there.=
There is really always very good reason for the choice of traditional=
materials, so unless considering a radical, newly invented material never=
before used for making pots, then it is best not to believe in "new=
ideas". There is truly no such thing! Man has been making, baking, cooking=
and consuming for thousands of years, so we really have learned from past=
experience! Any why bother in this particular instance, with so many other=
exciting possibilies to explore?

Janet Kaiser

*** IN REPLY TO THE FOLLOWING MAIL:
>My experience is that when i make a teapot and fired it above 1220 degrees
>C. It goes well. But there is a space between the flame and the teapot and
>never put it on the tealight when it is not filled with tea.
>Then the teapot can crack. I make my work onely in the stoneware
>categorie...
>I also make chocolate fondue's and they don,t crack.
*** PREVIOUS MAIL ENDS HERE ***
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