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how much rutile (maximum amount) can be put into a glaze?

updated fri 23 feb 07

 

Judy Rohrbaugh on thu 22 feb 07


I am going to do a test this glaze load with one of my regular glazes.
Using the base, no colorants, trying to add a large amount of rutile.
Anything I may need to know?

I believe I have gone up to 12%, along with a colorant like copper.

Is 16-20% too much, ya think? Is more possible?


Thanks, before I test, thought I would ask.

Judy Rohrbaugh
Fine Art Stoneware
Ohio

Dan Semler on thu 22 feb 07


Hi Judy,

I'm not really sure what you are looking for. The absolute maximum =20
will likely be defined as so much that the glaze won't melt and adhere =20
well to the pot. Not sure what that would be. If you are just looking =20
for something, that is a rutile saturated glaze, a la iron saturate, =20
then something in the 15-20% range sounds fine to me. A lot will =20
depend on the nature of the base as to what will happen. It will also =20
depend on the iron oxide versus titantium dioxide concentration of =20
your rutile, and your firing conditions. Rather than just doing one =20
test, I'd be inclined to run say 5 or so variations each with =20
differing amounts. That will give you a better idea of what the =20
particular base can tolerate.

And yes you could certainly try more. I'm not sure that'll you'll =20
like what you get of course, and I don't know what use you are =20
planning to put them to, but it'll be interesting to know. Once you =20
have the results it'd be great to hear about them.

Thanx
D

Alex Solla on thu 22 feb 07


Well, it depends... mostly on the base glaze.
If you have a fairly stiff base, say a simple feldspathic glaze,
you'll find it hard to add more than 10% rutile to your glaze without
it becoming like sandpaper. BUT if you have a flux saturate, where normally
the glaze
would have a nice roll of glaze all the way to the kiln shelf, then you
might be able to go as
high as 15% rutile.

I guess my question is what is your goal with testing rutile and what
effect/color are you hoping for?

Good luck !

-Alex Solla

Cold Springs Studio Pottery
4088 Cold Springs Road
Trumansburg, NY 14886
www.coldspringsstudio.com




Judy asked:
How much rutile is too much?


I believe I have gone up to 12%, along with a colorant like copper.

Is 16-20% too much, ya think? Is more possible?


Thanks, before I test, thought I would ask.

Judy Rohrbaugh
Fine Art Stoneware
Ohio

Edouard Bastarache Inc. on thu 22 feb 07


Judy,

I have learned not to exceed 8% of rutile in a
glaze.


Later,




Edouard Bastarache
Le Franšais Volant
The Flying Frenchman

Sorel-Tracy
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Judy Rohrbaugh on thu 22 feb 07


I use rutile in almost all of my glazes along with a colorant.
Testing it alone is just something I keep meaning to do, but now I have made a few bottles,
and wanted a glaze to go over the top part of the bottles that has some kind of interest,
mottling, etc. I fire cone 5 or 6 ox. and this is to go over a white clay.
I was interested in trying rutlie as a colorant and whatever alse would
appear as an interesting surface.
I will post to the list after I test to let you all know if I get anything.
Judy Rohrbaugh